Textile supply chain tools provide essential transparency for consumers

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Generating awareness of supply chains and providing customers with information on the supply chain journey of a garment is essential to develop awareness of sustainability and the social impact of textile production. Transparency of supply chains is vital to helping consumers become more aware of supply issues and allowing them to support brands and manufacturers that are actively seeking sustainability. Due to the amount of data and information available in supply chains, this has been a difficult message to communicate to consumers in the past. However, technology developments such as QR codes now enable consumers to trace a garment’s history and provenance throughout the supply chain, from concept design to being ready to purchase. Consumers can look at the whole value of the garment, beyond just price. Such supply chain software also allows manufacturers to champion local materials and sustainable practices in their brands quickly to consumers, increasing customer engagement and brand awareness.

Consumers want and need effective supply chain information

Increasingly environmentally engaged consumers want more information on the supply chains of their garments. Customers are becoming increasingly environmentally and socially aware and they want to be able to see the true impact and footprint of the item they’re buying. Recent research by Stenden University found that consumers would favour brands that make their supply chain clear, with up to 90% willing to pay more for sustainable items. However, customers still find sustainable clothing hard to source, which is why QR code supply chain systems can have such an impact. Providing consumers with relevant information on supply chains for each garment will drive the true habit change that is needed by consumers to achieve real sustainable textile production. Consumers will quickly be able to see the impact of the garment they’re buying, which is extremely impactful.

A QR barcode on a garment enables the customer to see the true value of an item’s supply chain immediately, allowing them to look past simply the price of the item. Scanning the code allows consumers to be truly informed about the supply chain of the item, including viewing the raw materials used, knowing where each process takes place, how far the garment has travelled, CO2 impact and finding out whether the manufacturer adheres to socially responsible manufacturing. Giving this information to customers easily will allow them to really make responsible choices, encouraging real change.

Brands can create a real marketing edge through supply chain tools

Such supply chain information systems are also great for manufacturers and brands, giving them a real marketing edge. Allowing customers to immediately see the provenance of an item means that the brand can champion key parts of their supply chain, making the brand immediately stand out. As an example, many consumers are not aware that British textile production continues to perform well, despite the move to large scale off shore supply. A simple scan of a QR code will allow British textile brands to highlight their ‘Made in Britain’ status, demonstrating for example, that the wool is from Scotland, it’s then spun in Yorkshire and finally knitted in Leicester.  A supply chain tool enables brands and manufacturers to clearly demonstrate and promote their local and sustainable credentials to consumers quickly and clearly, celebrating crucial parts of the supply chain. It also allows consumers to engage with a brand, reviewing products and making recommendations to other consumers, constantly developing brand connection and engagement.

Supply chain systems can generate real change in textile production

Supply chain systems through QR codes have the potential to create true habit change in consumers. Giving consumers a more thorough understanding of the impact of textile manufacture and the life cycle of a garment is the key to generating effective change. With a supply chain system, at the scan of a code, customers are able to view the supply chain for each garment, creating awareness and providing information on the whole chain quickly, including the social and environmental impact. Although vital for informing consumers, brands can also utilise such a tool to promote their sustainability and local credentials, creating real marketing edge and genuine engagement with consumers.

Bomler are manufacturers of a software system that gives full transparency in the supply chain, through either business to business or business to consumer uses. Consumers can trace their garment throughout the whole supply chain throughout the Consumer Application, providing effective information quickly on the entire supply chain of a garment. Textile Consult are the UK exclusive partner of Bomler, working to develop sustainable textile solutions.

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Textile Consult and Bomler connect for UK Market.

Textile Consult and Bomler are please to announce a partnership for the UK market.   Textile Consult are now the exclusive partner for Bomler’s cloud based Supply Chain Transparency Tool.Bomlers mission is to provide the means that enable better decisions by industry and consumers for economic value, product quality, social and environmental impact. On the platform brands can search for new suppliers by attribute, with Bomler’s algorithms finding and displaying best matches. Direct connection and communication occurs from within Bomler, and all chats are saved for historical records.

Suppliers have the capability to upload all independent certifications, audits and inspections, thus enabling prospective buyers to immediately see and trust the supplier’s capabilities and credibility. Uploading of key and relevant objective data allows a potential brand to see how reliable their goods or services have been for previous clients.  And, in an industry first both brands and suppliers will be encouraged to provide subjective feedback about the ease of working with each other. The combination of objective and subjective history enables relationships to begin faster and with greater alignment of expectations from each partner. Brands and suppliers will have separate unique and appropriate mobile functions  and screens to maximize their usage of the database. Any buyer can access the database through mobile to verify timing, performance and other relevant data.

For the consumer :
Bomler uses the supply chain data from the brand-supplier application to enable brands to connect with consumers who want to look beyond price and see the value offered by the supply chain.   Bomler functions offers consumer more information and interactions point that makes the shopping experience more valuable. A number of functions are available to our customers, which individually can be made accessible for consumers by simply turning them on or off.Functions can also be in integrated into e-commerce sites in order to provide an enriched and valuable shopping experience.

  • Create new value proposals(VIP, Reward Programs)
  • Let the consumer use “awareness” Information when shopping
  • Interlink with data sources, Facebook etc.

Key information – easy to find (REALLY)

Bomler allows suppliers to be very textile specific in presenting their capabilities, capacities and compliance. Similarly than Suppliers, Buyers are able to show their company capabilities, preferences and needs. Suppliers are validated through data and reviews.

If you would like to hear more about Bomlers innovative new software or would like to arrange a free no obligation 30 day trial of the platform : 

  • UK or Ireland then contact us here
  • Rest of the World then click here

Scarf Manufacturing Benefiting Soccer Fans Around the World: And We Are Happy to Help

 

Posted August, 2017 by by 
It might not be as popular here in Canada and the USA, but go anywhere around the world and you’ll see that Soccer (or as they say, “football”!) is the king of all world sports. Nothing excites fans and drives the crowds wild like seeing a skilled striker ply his art form and blast a goal into the net. It’s the only game that drives national pride the way it does!And, of course, if you’re a fan of a particular country or football club, there’s no better way to profess your loyalty than with some fan gear to wear, twirl, or stretch out for all to see at the next game. IMS Industrial Machine Sales provides the machinery that is driving this resurgence worldwide.Why do fans love scarves so much?

There’s nothing like standing in a packed stadium, shouting on a terrace, or sitting at home in front of the TV cheering on your favourite club while waving a scarf in the air. For us Canadians, it might actually be more than a fashion statement, we might actually need it to fight off the cold. Scarves are the perfect accessory for a few main reasons:

– They’re easily portable
– The highly detailed knits of modern machinery allow for HD quality
– They cost considerably less than jerseys and shirts

Major world soccer events are driving an increase in sales

Companies looking to get into the business of selling fan scarves or those already in it looking to upgrade their equipment would be happy to see the increasing demand around the world. Untold thousands have been ordered for major events such as the World Cup in 2014 and the most recent Copa America and European Football Championship, both of 2016.

Once considered only for the prestigious clubs and associated with tie-wearing coaches, scarves are now a mainstay outside of every English football Stadium, American baseball park, or Canadian Hockey Rink. The North American MLS league is even in on the trend.

Made with incredible quality and sometimes taking up to 10 separate steps including winding, weaving, cutting, and custom embroidery, the machine that you choose to manufacture the products is of utmost importance.

At IMS Industrial Machine Sales, we have a wide inventory of quality new and pre-owned machines that produce high-quality scarves, and the growing demand for soccer scarves around the world is fueling the growth of the industry by the day. If you’re looking for affordable machinery to give you a competitive edge, browse our inventory of circular knitting machines or contact us today.

‘The difference between style and fashion is quality’.

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Giorgio Armani is quoted with saying that ‘the difference between style and fashion is quality’. In the era of fast, disposable fashion, this quote has never seemed more apt. As consumers and manufacturers wake up to the damaging effects of fast fashion and throwaway designs, the focus on quality, style and sustainable manufacturer of garments is essential. Fashion is designed to be fleeting and throwaway, but consumers, designers and manufacturers must once again embrace quality items that are designed to last. The addiction to fast fashion has to end. The focus should now be on true style, quality garments and quality production.

The problem with being fashionable

Everyone wants to look good and we all love having nice clothes. Fast fashion has allowed us to keep constantly up to date with fashion and trends at an increasingly low price at an increasing speed. The problem is, fast fashion means we’re drowning in cheap, poorly made clothes that don’t last more than a few wears. Fast fashion has become an addiction. In 1930, the average US woman owned nine outfits. In 2017, the average woman purchased approximately sixty new items of clothing per year. A UK study found that approximately 30% clothes items aren’t even worn.  According to WRAP, around £140m, or 350,000 tonnes worth of unwanted and overbought clothing goes straight to landfill in the UK. This staggering increase in consumption is fuelled by manufacturers and suppliers who drive the need for this constant buying. Brands such as H&M and Zara have truly embraced fast fashion, developing up to 100 micro seasons of clothes each year instead of the 2-4 seasons that was usual in the past.

Although fast fashion is tempting for consumers, this constant cycle of cheap, mass production has serious consequences for the environment and the textile workers that produce them. Clothes produced in this way are often incredibly poorly made- they shrink or fall apart after a few washes, perpetuating the cycle of over buying and over producing more. Incredibly, some clothes are actually designed to fall apart. To be truly stylish, you need to buy fewer clothes, and buy better.

Encouraging lasting style over a fast fashion fix

Consumers need to be prepared to spend more money on clothes. This may be a difficult concept for consumers used to £10 jeans or £2 t shirts, but spending more money per item of clothing is a significant way to encourage reducing consumption. Buying fewer items that are better quality is the key. But how do we encourage consumers and brands to focus on quality?

Focusing on style, rather than fashion is essential for this process. Fashion by its very nature focuses on fleeting, on trend items that are churned out by the hundreds of thousands. As a result, quality is poor and the items will never last- they’re not supposed to. Style on the other hand celebrates well thought out, well designed and well-made items. Paying more per item of clothing allows the buyer to really think about what they’re buying. Journalist Marc Bain decided to spend a minimum of $150 per item. While price is no guarantee of quality and this amount is unmanageable for many, setting a minimum price per item encourages proper thought before purchasing, reduces the amount of impulse buying and encourages purchases of greater quality- you want them to last.

Quality-focus has been at the forefront for many companies. WRAP’s Sustainable Clothing Action Plan focuses on encouraging better design and quality in the manufacture of clothes, encouraging a longer life of each item. Forward-thinking brands are encouraging customers to value the clothes they buy by offering clothing guarantees. Levi’s, Nudie Jeans and Patagonia all offer repair and alternations services for their clothes to discourage constant buying, all while highlighting the increased use you can get out of quality items.

Buying better quality items is beneficial to consumers for many ways. Quality clothes are better made, they look better, last longer and are a more cost-effective option in the long run. They’re also more likely to be made from better quality natural materials with better treated textile workers, so consumers can actively, genuinely support sustainable fashion while benefiting from better produced items.

The addiction to fast fashion needs to fall out of style

Although fast fashion is currently irresistibly cheap, impulse buying cheaply made garments will never equate to being stylish. Consumers and brands need to work together to focus on wanting true style, producing and buying quality, lasting garments that will last through the years. Buying quality will help to reduce the negative environmental and social impacts of over consumption of fashion and will celebrate real style. Quality garments also benefit the consumer, allowing quality design, manufacture and textiles to be celebrated. It will require a huge shift in mind set, but the addiction to fast fashion, for both consumers and manufactures needs to stop.

Textile Consult is a management and training consultancy for textile manufacturers and retailers worldwide. Contact us today to see how we can make your business more effective and sustainable.

Are fast fashion brands really as sustainable as they claim to be?

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Water use, polluting commodities, chemical dyes and poor supply chains mean the demand for fast fashion is affecting the planet, both socially and environmentally. Fashion is the second most polluting industry on earth after oil. To their credit, in response to this and consumer demand, manufacturers and fashion brands are continuing to strengthen and develop eco-friendly, sustainable fashion practices. These include addressing supply chains across global production, developing sustainable materials and reducing waste in production. But how much of this is truly sustainable and how much is clever marketing? Are brands merely ‘greenwashing’ their sustainability claims to appeal to the demand for sustainable eco-fashion? A recent report on viscose from Changing Markets highlights how fashion brands cleverly market sustainability to address their agenda without truly addressing environmental impacts and pressures across the supply chain.

Brands need to take greater responsibility for encouraging and manufacturing actual sustainable fashion. After all, their very business model of fast throwaway fashion is not sustainable. Eco initiatives by these companies have been promoted, but there are still major issues within the supply chain causing environmental and social harm. Brands need to stop ‘greenwashing their marketing claims or overly promoting their eco credentials to fit their marketing agenda.

Fast fashion brands need to end greenwashing

Fashion brands are now keen to be seen to address sustainability concerns in clothes manufacture. The second biggest polluter on the planet, they can no longer ignore this issue. The increase of eco-awareness among consumers also makes it extremely profitable for brands, and this is the danger. How genuine is the impact and drive of brands to address sustainability in fashion, and how much is clever ‘greenwashing’ marketing with dubious aims?

Although they have increased their transparency, fashion giant H&M have been criticised for regular greenwashing. This includes inflating claims to consumers on their worldwide organic cotton use, not changing working conditions for workers in factories and giving key pieces in their ranges a ‘Conscious Collection’ label due to the eco-products used, but failing to address the poor labour conditions in which they were made. Another example of greenwashing is bamboo. Bamboo is often marketed as an eco-friendly material by many fast fashion brands. However, while it’s technically more sustainable than cotton, the production of bamboo uses a high amount of pesticides and pollutants, a fact that does not tend to be mentioned in the marketing material for big brands hailing its sustainability.

Viscose production highlights the impact of polluting raw materials

One stark example of this is a recent Changing Markets report, concerning the production of viscose which really highlights how fashion brands need to do more.  Although technically a sustainable product the demands placed by manufacturers of fast fashion means the production of viscose is often harmful. Fashion brands such as H&M, M&S and ASOS already market viscose as a green, sustainable product, but this is not entirely true. The viscose industry is often highly polluting, having a negative environmental and social impact. These impacts include toxic pollution, environmental damage, health impacts from toxins and poor conditions for workers. Brands need to play a key role in cleaning up viscose production by demanding cleaner and fairer viscose production. Global fashion brands can play a vital role in this process by using their massive power to influence change that is truly sustainable, including encouraging closed loop supply, conducting regular audits and only using viscose producers who take sustainability seriously.

Brands need to be more honest in their sustainable fashion marketing

Transparency is a vital tool to create change in the fashion industry, inspiring brands to move towards more eco-friendly business models. These reduce the impact of production at an environmental and social level. But for real sustainability, brands need to become not only more transparent in their production, but also more honest and transparent in their marketing of sustainable fashion to consumers. Eco friendly fabrics and sustainable production are great marketing angles for fashion brands, but brands need to be more honest in the impact of the whole production chain. As well as addressing the whole model of fast fashion being inherently unsustainable, fast fashion brands such as H&M, M&S and Forever 21 need to address working conditions, material sourcing and production and polluting effects of the raw materials used in their manufacture such as with viscose. Currently fashion brands are able to change their sustainability narrative to suit them. Without addressing these parts of the supply chain, a true sustainability claim should be considered as dubious. Although more eco-friendly initiatives and production methods are being developed by fashion brands, until all parts of the supply chain are genuinely sustainable, brands should be more honest in their sustainability claims and marketing.

Textile Consult is a management and training consultancy for textile manufacturers and retailers. Contact us today to see how we can make your business more effective and sustainable.

Are auditing costs creating a barrier to a truly sustainable textile industry?

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Due to negative environmental impacts, human rights issues and consumer demand, the textile industry is continually developing ways become truly sustainable and environmentally responsible. Initiatives such as the development of eco-fabrics, effective recycling of fast fashion and closed loop supply chains are all being addressed by manufacturers and brands. One of the main areas where manufacturers and brands have been seeking to create a real impact on sustainability and in textiles is auditing.

Auditing is an essential process in a globalised textile industry. Auditing allows international standards to be developed, agreed upon and carried out to ensure continuity in quality of manufacture. Well developed and robust auditing procedures have the potential to create a truly sustainable textile industry. However, the cost of auditing is also a genuine issue for manufacturers and textile suppliers, creating a real barrier to potential sustainability. If textiles are to ever become truly sustainable, this needs to change.

Obstacles to effective auditing in the textile industry

There are many obstacles to the industry to achieving true sustainability in textile manufacture, including fast fashion demands, consumer attitudes and stresses with a global supply chain. However, the most significant issue creating a barrier for the industry is cost. Suppliers working for a major brand will be likely to be working with minimum profit margins, resulting in limited funds available for investment in sustainable technologies and training.

Initiatives such as Coshh, Reach, OekoTex and ZDHC have been implemented in order to achieve more sustainable processes within the textile industry. However, although these initiatives are admirable, they also significantly increase the costs on factories, with accreditation being one of the main areas of cost.

Accreditation as part of auditing in its current form has never been a truly cost effective solution for textile manufacturers or brands, but the situation has now become unsustainable. This is now impacting negatively the efficacy of sustainable developments in textiles. Retailers often sign up to multiple accreditation programs, resulting in multiple audits and therefore multiple costs for manufacturers. This continuing financial pressure placed on factories by retailers is potentially seriously damaging the ability to create sustainable supply chains and textile products.

The process of accreditation needs to be reviewed in order to make it effective as possible, allowing the industry to create textiles that are sustainable and environmentally accountable.

How can textile auditing costs be reduced for manufacturers?

It’s essential that the auditing system is robust, with qualified and competent auditors. Increasing the effectiveness of the auditing and accreditation procedures will ensure factories and manufacturers have increased funds to invest in sustainability.

There are two main solutions to solving this barrier of auditing costs for manufacturers in the future. Firstly, it would be most effective for retailers and brands to clearly decide on one quality, well trained and knowledgeable auditing body to carry out the auditing work, with the information on the factory performance being shared globally across all brands. This would lead to an agreed globally recognised performance level, reducing the need for multiple audits and importantly, multiple costs for factories.

Secondly, bringing the accreditation process in-house by the various organisations would be a further way to streamline this process. If a brand is seeking ZDHC accreditation for example, ZDHC would be dealt with directly. This streamlining would reduce costs for factories and retailers.

Sustainability needs to be taken seriously

Sustainability is the fastest growing sector of the textile industry with varying levels of professionalism and results.  For the textile industry to become truly sustainable, it needs to to take the issue seriously. Addressing the financial impacts of multiple audits and accreditation by reducing the number of audits required is an important first step. This will give manufacturers, retailers and brands alike the financial ability to develop effective solutions to really address the environmental impact of textiles, creating a sustainable future.

Textile Consult is a management and training consultancy for textile manufacturers and retailers. Contact us today to see how we can make your business more effective and sustainable.

 

 

How can consumer behaviour change the fashion industry?

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Consumer behaviour towards fast fashion must change

Fashion is the second most polluting industry on the planet and is having a massive impact on the earth’s resources. The textile production and demands of fast fashion mean that there are severe impacts on natural resources, exploitation of workers and environmental damage through manufacturing, waste and disposal of clothes.  Many manufacturers, brands and suppliers are now addressing issues of sustainability through eco-friendly textile production, but this isn’t enough. In order to make a true difference in the sustainability of textile production, consumers must lead the way. Consumers have the power to demand change. However, changing consumer behaviour towards fast fashion is complex, so there must be a combined approach from industry to create truly effective change.

Consumers must take more responsibility for creating sustainable fashion

The fashion industry has responded to the need to develop more sustainable fashion options and eco-friendly fashion production. Campaigns such as Fashion Revolution, Fair Wear and Clean Clothes are starting to gain traction in the industry. Suppliers and brands are developing and using more eco-friendly manufacturing techniques, creating eco dyes and fabrics, implementing Corporate Social Responsibility actions, proactively educating their customers on fashion sustainability and streamlining textile supply chains to reduce waste.  Although these measures are having an impact, the consumer still remains reluctant to purchase sustainable fashion. Without their buy-in, the fashion industry won’t be able to, or have the motivation to change. Consumers need to take some responsibility too.

Consumers have complex buying behaviours

Buying fashion is a complex process for consumers. The emotional aspects of self-image, impulse purchases and constantly changing fashion combine with cost, personal circumstances, massive over consumption and lack of awareness of the fashion industry to create a difficult set of behaviours to try to change.

Encouraging the consumer to change their fashion buying behaviour

This complex nature of fashion consumption means that there is not one easy solution to motivate the customer to buy or demand sustainable fashion and textiles. A combined approach between the consumer and manufacturers needs to be developed in order to generate momentum and lasting change. Many start-up brands and traditional manufacturers are developing initiatives to encourage consumers to want to buy sustainable fashion. These include:

  • Increasing awareness and education of the environmental impact and consequences of fast fashion and the benefits of sustainable fashion. Campaigns such as the Sweatshop series and campaigns by leading retailers such as M&S’ Plan A will make a huge impact on educating consumers.
  • Brands need to create sustainable clothes that are also fashionable so that people want to buy and wear them. Consumers want to buy fashionable clothes and making this a priority in sustainably produced garments will be essential to changing customer behaviour.
  • Industry and manufacturers need to develop strong recycling and waste reduction programmes that are easy for the consumer use, while addressing pre and post recycling streams. Making sure that garments and textiles can be effectively and easily recycled in the first place is also is vital.
  • Developing new and different ways for consumers to experience fashion. Many eco-fashion focused start-up companies are leading this area, encouraging consumers to think about their fashion buying while offering guilt free solutions. These include MUD Jeans who introduced their guilt free ‘Lease A Jeans’, Tom Cridland’s 30 year jacket, and Rentez-Vous.
  • Investing in campaigns for consumers to love their clothes, rather than constantly buying new ones. Campaigns such as Love Your Clothes inspire consumers to improve the sustainability of clothing across its lifecycle, encouraging customers to make small conscious changes.
  • Materialism as a concept needs to be examined. This is a difficult task, but ultimately both manufacturers and consumers need to take responsibility for their own over-consumption.

Changing consumer behaviour is vital to reduce the environmental impact of fashion

Everyone agrees that fast fashion leads to environmental damage. Brands and manufacturers have started to address the sustainability of textiles through streamlined textile manufacturing and eco-initiatives, but without getting the consumer on board, textile production will never truly become sustainable. A combined, interactive and purposeful approach is essential- without the support and changed behaviour of consumers, fashion will continue to pollute and exploit the environment. Consumers have the power to demand real, effective sustainability in their fashion and textiles and change in consumer buying behaviour is the key to making real change in the fashion industry.

Textile Consult  provides world class experts to support, advise and work with your teams in all aspects of textile manufacture, including sustainability, process auditing, problem solving and training. 

 

Online Presence…..

Here at Textile Consult Ltd we appreciate that your time is precious.  We also appreciate that the nature of the global textile industry means that it is not always practical or cost effective to meet face to face to discuss your requirements or work on your project.  This is why Textile Consult is taking our services online to support our clients and to help you work in a more cost effective and efficient way.  Hopefully you have read our previous blog piece on our new venture Textile Audit.  We are now launching online workshops,  via the ZEQR platform. We will be available every Monday and Wednesday afternoon to answer your textile wet processing , colour related issues.  Alternatively you can request a workshop at your convenience – just contact us through the ZEQR interface.  Our delve into the online world is continuing,  with new online courses being launched very shortly.  Keep checking back for more information.   Of course if you would like to just have a chat you can always just contact us to set up a meeting either in person, on the phone or online.  We look forward to hearing from you.

Transform your textile production with an online audit from Textile Audit

 

TexAud2An online audit from Textile Audit can improve your production processes

Increasingly detailed global supply chains mean that modern textile production can be a difficult process to manage. Constantly increasing demands from retailers, as well as the pressures of fast fashion mean it is essential mills and textile suppliers develop and improve production efficiency in order to keep up with these demands in supply, quality and service. If not, then issues in quality and production can arise. Audits are key to making sure your textile production is as streamlined as possible. By using our newly launched online textile audit, you’ll be able to benchmark your production processes, improving your efficiency, production quality and potential order capacity. You’ll be confident that you’ll be meeting industry best practices.

 Textile production can be difficult to manage

Fast fashion is driving constant changes within the textile supply chain. These demands change rapidly due to fashion trends and an often volatile market situation. The unpredictable nature of these changes occur in a short space of time, often creating significant difficulties for retailers, brands and manufacturers all in the supply chain.  Due to constant issues with poor product supply, quality and service, brands and retailers are understandably demanding-  they want increased visibility and confidence in their supply chain.

Additionally, it is often difficult for retailers to find new textile suppliers and for brands to fully understand the technical capabilities of any new supplier. Audits give confidence to all parties in the textile supply chain and are essential to maximise the efficiency and capacity of your production. You’ll be able to truly understand the component parts of your business, which will give potential partners confidence when awarding contracts.

An audit will identify improvements in your textile production

The fast paced nature of working to exacting deadlines means it is often difficult for suppliers to find the time to monitor, identify and improve efficiencies within textile production with a traditional onsite audit. Although not designed to replace an onsite audit, our online audit process will provide you with an important benchmark process that will enable you to streamline and develop your production systems. The benefits of this for your textile production include:

  •  Developing efficiencies in supply processes
  • An increasingly efficient process will lead to a higher quality product
  • Increased efficiency and consistency in quality will generate more interest from brands, resulting in higher potential orders and profit.

How Textile Audit can help your business

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An online audit from Textile Audit will help you identify improvements in your factory operation, allowing you to increase your production efficiency and supply quality. Assessing procedure and systems in your manufacture will enable all parties in the supply chain to have confidence in production quality, leading to increased potential orders and ultimately, increased profitability for your business.

The Textile Audit is available for minimal cost and is easy to complete online. The audit questions are user-friendly and collect your information ready for the analysis of your current set up. After completing and submitting your audit, you’ll receive a professional analysis report and an action plan for improving and developing your current set-up.

The audit will help you to:

  • Improve the finish quality of your textile products
  • Optimise your production process to ensure consistent quality
  • Reduce your RTMs
  • Identify efficiencies and waste savings
  • Strengthen and streamline your supply chain

After this report, further consultation is available through Textile Consult. This further in-depth consultation will, for example, assist in implementation of the plan or to complete an onsite visit.

Carry out your Textile Audit today

Contact us today to discuss your audit requirements, or take a look at our full range of audit products on our website. We’re looking forward to help make your manufacturing more efficient and profitable. If you’d also like to find out more about our in-depth textile consultancy services, then please contact us via our Textile Consult website.

Case Study: Libertad Apparel

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Textile production is expensive. Dealing with manufacturers halfway across the world can add stresses to a difficult, technical process, often made harder with cultural communication challenges. By working with Textile Consult, we can anticipate your business interests, offer solutions to any difficulties arising in your textile production and make the process a lot easier for you to navigate- saving you time and money. One of our recent clients was Libertad Apparel.

Libertad is a Kickstarter project producing luxury Merino wool travel shirts. During production of these shirts in China, Libertad faced some significant unforeseen challenges, including product failure in the first bulk production and communication with the factory. Our technical and commercial expertise gave Libertad credibility and authority in an often difficult environment, ensuring issues were solved with positive outcomes for both parties, with the shirts ultimately being produced to the high quality required.

You can find out more about Libertad by watching their brand video.

The connection

Ian from Textile Consult originally connected with Libertad’s CEO, Kyle via Linked In. Following this connection, Ian learned of the challenges Libertad were having with their Merino wool travel shirt production in China.

The issues

Despite rigorous R&D and exacting standards, the biggest issue facing Libertad was the variation between the fully signed off product samples of the unique lightweight fabric at the R&D stage and the first run of the bulk production of the Merino shirts. This led to product failure. Although protected contractually against product failure, it was proving problematic for Libertad to work with the factory to find the cause of the failure and define a solution. This was hugely time-consuming and expensive, with cultural and communication challenges also adding some extra difficulty to the situation.

None of the production issues could have been foreseen by either Libertad or the manufacturer, but the input and expertise of Textile Consult enabled Libertad to credibly resolve the situation for both parties. In the end, the weaving partner remade the fabric and the shirts were produced to the high quality required by Libertad for their brand, with excellent results.

How Textile Consult helped

Textile Consult gave me much-needed credibility and leverage in a very precarious environment.’

Kyle, CEO, Libertad Apparel

We worked with Libertad to identify solutions to the production issues. These included:

Technical expertise

We advised what was realistically achievable as to variations in the textile product.

Objective support

We supported Libertad’s responses to the factory with objective evidence. Although the issues in production could not have been predicted, this evidence meant that the factory accepted product failure as covered by the contract, which was vital to protect Libertad’s financial interests.

Cultural and communication insight

We provided insight into the workings of the Chinese factory and culture, which was essential when presenting Libertad’s case.

Future implementations

We advised on the benefits of having a Letter of Credit in place for future production and transactions. This will give Libertad essential financial leverage.

The results

Working with textile manufacturers half way across the world can often be a challenging process, both technically and culturally, with any mistakes in production being costly for the company. Our textile industry experience provided solutions to the production issues, ensuring that Libertad’s travel shirts were produced to the high quality demanded by the brand, despite early difficulties experienced in bulk production with the unique fabric.

Contact us

Textile Consult will provide you with professional expertise in the commercial and technical aspects of textile production. Email us to discuss how we can help.